Healthc'air Driver

  1. 47 Healthcare Driver jobs available on Indeed.com. Apply to Patient Services Representative, Delivery Driver, Records Coordinator and more!
  2. Passionate about customer care, with the ability to communicate effectively with patients, visitors and healthcare staff. Able to work under pressure, individually and as part of a team with a flexible approach to meet the needs of the business.
  3. Health Care Driver Jobs. Salary Information. $67011 national avg. Suite 1100, Chicago, IL 60601. International Jobs.

Key drivers of high US healthcare spending identified Date: March 13, 2018 Source: Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Summary: The major drivers of high healthcare costs in the US appear to.

Drivers are at the heart of the NHS by making sure that our patients, goods and supplies are where they need to be at the right time.

Working life

As a driver, you could drive:

  • a patient transport service (PTS) vehicle (part of the ambulance service)
  • a minibus to collect patients to go to a day centre
  • a van to transport supplies or documents around NHS sites
  • a mobile dental unit for a community health provider
  • a NHS Blood and Transplant vehicle as part of the blood donor team

You may be responsible for checking the vehicle before and after work, keeping it clean inside and out and reporting any faults.

Some PTS drivers are volunteers who use their own cars to transport patients.

You may be responsible for checking the vehicle before and after work, keeping it clean inside and out and reporting any faults.

Drivers may combine driving with other work, for example

  • driver/fitter
  • driver/storesperson
  • driver/warehouse operative

Who will I work with?

Depending on your role, you might work with ambulance care assistants nurses or donor carers. You may also work alone.

Entry requirements

Drivers in the NHS have to have the correct driving licence for the vehicle they drive. Most employers expect you have a driving licence when you apply. NHS and ambulance service trusts use vehicles of different sizes, so check carefully which classifications you need on your licence.

Employers expect good levels of numeracy and literacy. They may ask for GCSEs (or equivalent) in English and maths. Employers may also ask for relevant driving or customer service experience. This could be from paid or voluntary work.

Skills needed

Health Air Drivers

NHS drivers need to be:

  • safe and careful drivers
  • physically fit for getting in and out of vehicles and loading and unloading
  • able to navigate around an area using sat nav or maps
  • able to keep to a schedule
  • willing to work unsupervised
  • driving skills
  • good customer service skills, especially when dealing with patients
  • communication skills
  • organisation skills

Training and development

When you join the NHS as a driver, you will get the training you need. This may depend on the type of driving you are doing. The training may include health and safety, lifting and handling and customer care. You can expect to go on short courses on particular topics such as handling hazardous waste. You may be encouraged to take further qualifications such as training to drive other vehicles.

With experience, you could progress to become a team leader or supervisor and be in charge of a team of drivers. You can also progress by training to drive other vehicles and even apply to become a driving instructor.

You could also apply to train for other roles such as an emergency care assistant or ambulance care assistant.

Pay and benefits

Drivers directly employed by the NHS will be paid on the Agenda for Change (AfC) pay system, usually at bands 2 or 3. You'll work standard hours of around 37.5 a week andmay work shifts including early starts and evenings. Some drivers may be volunteers and paid an allowance for using their vehicle.

  • Live vacancies

    Most NHS trusts advertise their vacancies on NHS Jobs. Some of the current vacancies are below.

    • View Vacancy

      Driver

      Deeside Community Hospital/Wrexham ALAC, Wrexham - Flintshire, LL13 7TD

      • Salary:

        £18,185 - £19,337 per annum pro rata

      • Type:

        Permanent

      • Employer:

        Betsi Cadwaladr University Local Health Board

      • View Vacancy
    • View Vacancy

      Driver

      Malton, YO17 7NG

      • Salary:

        £8.72 per hour

      • Type:

        Permanent

      • Employer:

        Vocare Ltd

      • View Vacancy
    • View Vacancy

      Driver

      Malton, YO17 7NG

      • Salary:

        £8.72 per hour

      • Type:

        Permanent

      • Employer:

        Vocare Ltd

      • View Vacancy
    • View Vacancy

      Driver

      Leicester/Oakham/Loughborough, Leicester, LE19 1SX

      • Salary:

        9.92

      • Type:

        Bank

      • Employer:

        DHU Health Care CIC

      • View Vacancy
    • View Vacancy

      Receptionist Driver

      Macclesfield District General Hospital, Macclesfield, SK10 3BL

      • Salary:

        £18,005 - £19,337 per annum pro rata

      • Type:

        Bank

      • Employer:

        East Cheshire NHS Trust

      • View Vacancy
    • View Vacancy

      Emergency Response Driver (Retrieve) (Bristol, Launceston).

      Bristol, BS2 0TZ

      • Salary:

        £20488.00 a year

      • Type:

        Permanent

      • Employer:

        Central Advertising - Other

      • View Vacancy

In 2012, healthcare costs per person averaged almost $9,000, a monumental increase from 2007, when healthcare per capita hovered around $7,600.

Healthcare Driver Job Description

Total spending on healthcare reaching $2.8 trillion in 2012, according to the latest data from CMS, and the trends have led to a panel to tackle the challenge.

The State Health Care Cost Containment Commission, part of the University of Virginia's Miller Center, released a report detailing how the U.S. should address its high-cost problems. The Commission, co-chaired by former HHS Secretary Mike Leavitt and former Colorado Gov. Bill Ritter Jr., includes several prominent hospital and health system leaders: Glenn Steele Jr., MD, president and CEO of Geisinger Health System in Danville, Pa., Lloyd Dean, president and CEO of Dignity Health in San Francisco and George Halvorson, former chairman and CEO of Kaiser Permanente in Oakland, Calif.

The Commission's report outlined many findings, including the main drivers of high healthcare costs in the U.S. Here are the nine primary drivers, according to the report.

1. Physician, facility and drug costs. Data from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development have consistently showed the average unit costs for U.S. physicians, hospitals, facilities and drugs are the highest in the world.

2. Expensive technologies and procedures. When Americans do receive treatment, they often choose the most expensive technologies and procedures. For example, MRIs in the United States occur twice as often compared with the average country in OECD data.

3. Fragmented and uncoordinated care. Because care providers often treat the same patient with little consultation, unnecessary care, errors and dissatisfaction proliferates.

Healthc

4. Lack of cost consideration from patients. There is an assumption among patients that the most expensive care leads to the best quality, but expensive care has no correlation with quality. Patients have limited capabilities to participate in the cost decision making process of their care.

5. Fee-for-service. Hospitals and physicians are reimbursed for every service they provide, which often leads to a focus on volumes instead of a focus on care.

6. High administrative expenses. The morass of health insurers and billing processes cost the U.S. healthcare system billions in wasted costs every year.

7. Unhealthy behaviors. Chronic illnesses — like heart disease, cancer and diabetes — cause about 70 percent of all deaths in the United States, and they are the most expensive to treat. A majority of chronic illnesses stem from unhealthy behaviors.

8. Expensive end-of-life care. The last year of an American's life is the most expensive for medical treatment, and the unnecessary procedures and repeated hospitalizations provide little value to the patient and the system at large.

9. Provider consolidation. Hospitals and health systems are merging and acquiring each other at a feverish pace, and the same goes for physician groups. Studies have shown that although provider consolidation leads to some economies of scale, the increased market power leads to higher prices and oligopolistic behaviors.

More Articles on Healthcare Costs:
Is Healthcare Spending Finally Under Control?
Survey: CFOs Optimistic But Concerned About Healthcare Costs
3 Strategies to Contain Acute-Care Costs

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